CD reviews: Vladimir Jurowski conducts Mahler’s Symphony No. 1

June 19, 2013

LPO-0070 Mahler 1 cover webOur latest LPO Label CD release, Mahler’s Symphony No. 1 under Vladimir Jurowski with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, has received some great reviews in the press.

‘The LPO’s playing is classy, crystal-clear, and vividly characterised, with a fiery contribution from the seven-strong horn section … The first movement’s gear-shifts between the recurring, ultra-still music of the opening and the main Allegro material are notoriously tricky to bring off; Jurowski handles them beautifully, conjuring pin-dropping atmosphere in the quiet moments.’
Malcolm Hayes, Sinfini Music

‘Everything about the dewy dawn of this Mahler One is perfect: the well-articulated and perfectly placed distant trumpet fanfares, spirited false cuckoo-calls … The point and spirit of the finale are dazzling, the tempo changes masterly throughout.’
David Nice, BBC Music Magazine, July 2013 (not online)

‘The LPO strings are on fire in the opening of the finale, and has the second theme ever felt so naturally, honestly phrased? … If ever there was a case for wanting the roar of applause, this is it.’
Edward Seckerson, Gramophone, June 2013 (not online)

‘Jurowski’s vivid reading … announces its intentions early on with the clarinet’s startlingly physical cuckoo call, and is exceptionally faithful to the Berliozian separation of timbres that was Mahler’s response to the blended textures of Austro-German music.’
David Cairns, The Sunday Times, 2 June 2013 (not online)

The CD is priced £9.99 and is available from the LPO website, Amazon or as a download from iTunes.
LPO-0070, released May 2012

www.lpo.org.uk/recordings


More reviews of ‘Le nozze di Figaro’ at Glyndebourne with the LPO

June 12, 2013

The London Philharmonic Orchestra continues its run of Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro at Glyndebourne Festival Operaa revival of the 2012 Festival production directed by Michael Grandage and conducted by Jérémie Rhorer. See the full cast and production credits here.

Here are more press reviews (see earlier reviews here):

‘Much credit should go to Jérémie Rhorer, making his UK operatic debut, who conducts the London Philharmonic Orchestra with warmth and vitality – establishing pace and propelling the action forward, but with charm and a lightness of touch. The evening is a complete delight.’ (5 stars)
Laura Battle, Financial Times

‘Conductor Jérémie Rohrer is as fine a Mozartian as one could wish, and the LPO’s playing is electric in its energy and detail.’
Tim Ashley, The Guardian

‘The singing is excellent, the playing of the London Philharmonic Orchestra is crisp and delightful, but above all, Michael Grandage’s production brings out the humour in the opera magnificently.’ (5 stars)
William Hartson, The Express

‘The London Philharmonic Orchestra, led by the young, enthusiastic and multi-talented French conductor Jérémie Rhorer, gave an outstanding performance of Mozart’s magnificent score.’
Margarida Mota-Bull, Seen and Heard International

‘Revived for 2013 this superb production has taken on a new lease of life. Beautiful as it was, it is now simply delightful.’ (5 stars)
Andrew Kay, The Latest

‘There’s bounce to the playing, the ensembles are tight, and everything slots neatly into place.’
Neil Fisher, The Times (online access to subscribers only)

                                                                                                

Le nozze di Figaro (recorded live in 2012) will be broadcast in cinemas across the UK and online from 8 July 2013 – venues and booking details on the ‘In Cinemas’ tab here.

Between now and the end of August, the Orchestra will also give performances of Strauss’s Ariadne auf Naxos with Vladimir Jurowski, Donizetti’s Don Pasquale with Enrique Mazzola (a revival of the 2011 Tour production); and a revival of the 2010 production of Britten’s Billy Budd with Sir Andrew Davis. Visit the Glyndebourne website for more details.


Lydia Teuscher on playing Cherubino at Glyndebourne’s Marriage of Figaro

June 11, 2013

In the next instalment from the 2013 Glyndebourne Festival, German Soprano Lydia Teuscher discusses her role as Cherubino in Glyndebourne’s latest production of Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro.

Le Nozze di Figaro - Mozart - Glyndebourne Festival Opera - June 2013		 Figaro - Adam Plachetka Susanna - Laura Tatulescu Bartolo - Luciano De Pasquale Marcellina - Anne Mason Cherubino - Lydia Teuscher Don Basilio - Timothy Robinson Countess Almaviva -

You have performed in Le Nozze di Figaro before for Glyndebourne but in the role of Susanna. How does that compare with Cherubino, a very different character that you are playing in 2013?

The two roles couldn’t be more different on stage, Susanna is one of the longest roles in the operatic repertoire with the most stage time. Whereas Cherubino has less stage time and is more concerned about himself and the women around him. He is hated by the Count and he is loved by women. He is honest and adorable so the two roles are very different characters to sing and play which is both challenging and joyful! This particular production has such wonderful comedic moments that Cherubino is great fun to play from that perspective.

Mozart’s music has so much characterisation in it. How have you worked with this to interpret the role of Cherubino?

One of the most fascinating things about Mozart is that everything is so eloquently expressed through the music. The characters are simply there to enhance Mozart’s beautiful musical composition, giving the words their life and character. I have taken this inspiration and the boyish charm I hear in Cherubino’s voice and maximised this for the role.

Le Nozze di Figaro - Mozart - Glyndebourne Festival Opera - June 2013		 Figaro - Adam Plachetka Susanna - Laura Tatulescu Bartolo - Luciano De Pasquale Marcellina - Anne Mason Cherubino - Lydia Teuscher Don Basilio - Timothy Robinson Countess Almaviva -

You are working with some great singers in this year’s staging of Le Nozze di Figaro – the cast is a truly international one. How have all the personalities come together to create this wonderful piece?

I think this year’s cast is a very special one. The people are so nice and there is such an eclectic mix of personalities and singers, which is great for cast interaction and bonding. The cast have really worked together to create something new which is sometimes difficult when you have already performed your role in a variety of productions across the world. But at Glyndebourne the trick is to take on board the diversity of experience and make that your strength.

You have sung in London, Japan, São Paulo, Washington – the list is too long to go on! What is it about Glyndebourne that brings you back each time?

Quite simply, I adore the sheep! But seriously, I just love this place. Whenever I go somewhere else I know very soon if I love or hate it, and although I have had some very difficult experiences performing elsewhere in the past, I have never had that experience at Glyndebourne. It’s always been one of my favourite places to work and to perform, right away from my first experience here. It is partly due to the very high standards – in every respect – and partly because everybody who works at Glyndebourne (starting with the stage door team as you enter) are so nice and helpful, that performers here try their very best to be the best, and reflect the high standards across the board.

Le Nozze di Figaro - Mozart - Glyndebourne Festival Opera - June 2013		 Figaro - Adam Plachetka Susanna - Laura Tatulescu Bartolo - Luciano De Pasquale Marcellina - Anne Mason Cherubino - Lydia Teuscher Don Basilio - Timothy Robinson Countess Almaviva -

And finally, what are you looking forward to the most in this year’s Glyndebourne Festival?

I’m very much looking forward to all the performances with this wonderful cast and orchestra and Jeremy Rohrer! I have already had the chance to sing with LPO when we did Hänsel and Gretel which was a wonderful experience for me. But crucially I love to see all the other performances and enjoy the wonderful evenings at Glyndebourne. And now I have the chance to bring my family here to enjoy this quintessentially British experience.  What a delight for us all!

To book tickets and find out more about the operas on at the Glyndebourne Festival 2013 visit the Glyndebourne website For more information on the LPO’s Glyndebourne residency, visit our website.

Images © Robert Workman

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Previously for Glyndebourne:

Susanna/Le nozze di Figaro, Gretel/Hänsel und Gretel (GFO)

Recent engagements

Pamina/Die Zauberflöte (Bolshoi); Cecilio/Lucio Silla (Salzburg Festival); Pamina/Die Zauberflöte (concerts at Aix and the Mozart Festival Salzburg); Ighino/Palestrina (Bayerische Staatsoper); Susanna/Le nozze di Figaro (Semperoper Dresden); Zerlina/Don Giovanni (Bolshoi)

Forthcoming engagements:

Handel’s Messiah with the AAM

Born in Freiburg, Germany, she studied at the RWCMD and the Hochschule für Musik in Mannheim. She made early appearances at the Handel Festspiele Göttingen, Theater Heidelberg and Nationaltheater Mannheim before joining Semperoper Dresden as a company member. On the concert platform she has sung in London, Cologne, Antwerp, Korea, Japan, São Paulo, Washington, San Francisco and Melbourne.


Reviews: ‘Le nozze di Figaro’ at Glyndebourne with London Philharmonic Orchestra

June 10, 2013

The London Philharmonic Orchestra continues its annual summer residency at Glyndebourne Festival Opera, where it has appeared for the last 50 years. Last Saturday, 8 June 2013, saw the first performance this summer of Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro – a revival of the 2012 Festival production directed by Michael Grandage and conducted by Jérémie Rhorer. See the full cast and production credits here.

Here are the reviews from Saturday’s opening performance:

‘In the pit, Jérémie Rhorer takes the music at a snappy, witty pace whilst still cherishing the most tender moments … The orchestra responded with playing of elegance, lightness and verve. Gareth Hancock and Francis Bucknall framed the action with lively, witty continuo.’ (5 stars)
Melanie Eskenazi, MusicOMH

‘The conductor Jérémie Rhorer, a period specialist confronted by the modern London Philharmonic Orchestra, comes through with flying colours, often at tempi that some will find on the quick side, now and then punctuating Mozart with unexpected rubatos and fermatas, but always alert to his singers’ needs, and with a sure hand on the orchestra.’
Stephen Walsh, The Arts Desk

‘Jérémie Rhorer’s conducting of the London Philharmonic Orchestra had its moments …  The LPO played with spirit and with warmth’
Mark Berry, Opera Today

‘The LPO was on crisp form, and the fortepiano continuo was consistently alert and witty.’
Peter Reed, Classical Source

‘And never for a moment does Jérémie Rhorer in the pit with Glyndebourne’s other first-class orchestra, the London Philharmonic, let the momentum flag.’
Antony Craig, Gramophone

                                                                                                

Le nozze di Figaro (recorded live in 2012) will be broadcast in cinemas across the UK and online from 8 July 2013 – venues and booking details on the ‘In Cinemas’ tab here.

Between now and the end of August, the Orchestra will also give performances of Strauss’s Ariadne auf Naxos with Vladimir Jurowski, Donizetti’s Don Pasquale with Enrique Mazzola (a revival of the 2011 Tour production); and a revival of the 2010 production of Britten’s Billy Budd with Sir Andrew Davis. Visit the Glyndebourne website for more details.


Getting to know… Debut Sounds composer Daniel Kidane

June 6, 2013

Daniel Kidane started learning the violin aged 8 at the Royal College of Music Junior Department, and went on to study at the St. Petersburg Conservatoire. He is currently  studying for a Masters at the Royal Northern College of Music and recently toured with Manchester Camerata, conducting his harpsichord concerto Feuersturm. He is also one of our four Leverhulme Young Composers and is premiering his latest work From Point to Plane at Debut Sounds on Monday 10 June. 

We recently caught up with Daniel for a quick chat about electronics, Bach, Jurassic 5, and more …

Daniel Kidane photo

LPO: What was the first album / single you ever bought?

DK: I think it was a secondhand LP of Michael Jackson’s Thriller album.

What’s the most recent album / single etc you’ve bought?

The Azari & III album.

What’s your favourite film soundtrack?

At the moment Shutter Island.

What’s the most unusual musical instrument or ensemble you’ve played/written for/would like to write for?

Shruti box, electronics, cello and violin amplified through a megaphone

If you could go back in time and meet any composer from the past, who would it be?

J.S. Bach

How long have you been composing for?

I think I started dabbling in my early teens.

If you could collaborate with any artist from another field who might it be?

The Russian painter/philosopher Nicholas Roerich

Is there a defining moment you can pinpoint when you realised you wanted to be a composer?

After hearing my first pieces being performed live.

What else did you want to be ‘when you grew up’?

For a long time I wanted to be an astronaut and then a pilot.

Aside from classical/contemporary classical music, what other types of music do you listen to a lot?

Everything and anything – I like to mix it up: Johnny Cash, Jurassic 5, Pantera…

What was the last live performance/concert/festival/gig you went to?

The Philharmonia’s Centenary performance of The Rite of Spring.

What was the last book you read?

Russian short stories from Pushkin to Buida (Penguin Classics)

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Want to know more about Daniel and his upcoming premiere? Have a read of Daniel’s blog about his new piece, From Point to Plane, which will be performed at Debut Sounds on Monday 10 June at the Queen Elizabeth Hall. Tickets £9, students £4More info.

You can also listen to an excerpt from his piece Entwined here

Daniel is a current member of the Leverhulme Young Composers programme, alongside fellow composers Peter Yarde Martin, Hannah Kendall and Stephen Willey. 

For more about Daniel Kidane and his work visit:

danielkidane.com

soundcloud.com/daniel-kidane

The Leverhulme Young Composers is supported by an Arts Portfolio Grant from the Leverhulme Trust.


From Point to Plane: Daniel Kidane explains his Debut Sounds premiere

June 6, 2013

We quiz Leverhulme Young Composer Daniel Kidane on his Debut Sounds piece, From Point to Plane, which will be premiered on Monday 10 June.

LPO: What aspect of composing do you find the most difficult / most exciting when it comes to writing a new original orchestral work? What is the starting point for you?

DK: Starting a piece is always exciting but at the same time it’s sometimes the hardest point, as I have to distil all the ideas floating around in my mind.

How would you describe your composition style, if you can?

I always strive to make my music exciting and for me this usually involves writing that is quite virtuosic and driven.

How many draft versions of the score have you written/do you allow yourself before deciding on the final score?

Since the process spanned a considerable amount of time, I have had the luxury of working gradually and organically. Although I had the building blocks ready from the start I never fully knew how the piece would end. I did scrap a couple of ideas at the start, but mostly it’s been a straight road from start to finish.

How do you feel about having your first published work being performed by the London Philharmonic Orchestra in a big concert hall like the Queen Elizabeth Hall?

Very excited! It’s a great feeling to be sitting in a concert hall full of people listening to something you created. I sometimes wonder what they all think… 

How does it feel when you first hand your work over to an ensemble and you begin to hear it take shape?  

The nerves and excitement kick in and the process from start to finish is always very exhilarating.

Where does the title of your piece come from?

The title stems from Wassily Kandinsky’s writing Point and Line to Plane. His writings on perspective sparked my initial idea to merge descending lines and shifting their viewpoints.

Are there any other areas that you draw significant influence from in your work, other than musical influences (eg, visual arts, science, politics etc?)

A lot of my works usually have an extra musical idea that sparks my compositional process. Most of them tend to be linked with visual art or an idea from an artist.

You’ve been working with LPO Composer in Residence Julian Anderson – how has that been? Has this helped you develop your work in any particular way? To what extent do you draw inspiration or ideas from other 21st composers today?

Julian has been great as a mentor and it has been very useful to have him sit in on our workshops where he can lend his expert ear.

What can our Debut Sounds audiences expect on 10 June? Is there anything in particular you’d like them to take away from the evening / experience whilst listening to your work?

Having heard all the pieces during rehearsals, I’d say that I hope that the audience leaves with a bit of the energy and excitement that all of the pieces exude.

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Don’t miss the world premiere of From Point to Plane at Debut Sounds on Monday 10 June, 7.30pm at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Southbank Centre. Tickets £9, students £4More info.

Get to know the man behind the music in our chat with Daniel, covering everything from electronics, Bach, astronauts, Jurrasic 5, and more


June podcast: The Rest Is Noise and Tippett’s response to war

June 5, 2013

In June’s podcast, writer and broadcaster Daniel Snowman introduces Tippett’s A Child of Our Time

podcast_jun13_300

Michael Tippett wrote his secular oratorio A Child of Our Time between 1939 and 1941, in reaction to the events that triggered the horrors of Kristallnacht in Germany in 1938. In this pre-concert talk, writer and broadcaster (and member of the London Philharmonic Choir) Daniel Snowman explores the historical setting as well as the parallels with the great oratorios of Bach. It was recorded before the London Philharmonic Orchestra’s performance of the work in May 2013, at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall.

We are delighted that our recent recording of Brahms Symphony No 2 under Principal Conductor Vladimir Jurowski was chosen as the recommended recording of the work on BBC Radio 3’s Building a Library in June 2013.

Listen to clips and find out more > LPO-0043 (£10.99 incl P&P)

Throughout 2013, the London Philharmonic Orchestra appears as the major orchestral partner in Southbank Centre’s year-long, multi-art-form festival The Rest Is Noise. The festival looks at the key works of the 20th century through a wide lens, taking in the political happenings, social movements, cultural climates and personal stories that gave rise to these inspiring and sometimes controversial pieces of music.

Listen to the podcast >

www.lpo.org.uk

We’re on Twitter (@LPOrchestra) and Facebook (/londonphilharmonicorchestra)


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