Listen Again streaming: Dvorak, Janacek and Suk

May 9, 2012

The London Philharmonic Orchestra’s final concert of the 11-12 season at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall is now online. If you missed this programme of Suk, Janacek and Dvorak, conducted by Principal Conductor Vladimir Jurowski, you can listen to the complete performance online (until 23 May).

Listen Again >

In 2010 Vladimir Jurowski presided over a performance of Suk’s Asrael Symphony that electrified the atmosphere inside the Royal Festival Hall. Now he turns to Asrael’s successor Ripening, another huge orchestral canvas in which the composer grapples with his tragic demons and ultimately finds a radiating transcendence. ‘In it you will find all the degrees of human emotions’ Suk said of Ripening, and he wasn’t exaggerating. It’s heard here after the Piano Concerto by the man whose death inspired both Asrael and Ripening: Suk’s father-in-law Dvořák. This is without doubt one of the best-kept secrets of the Romantic repertoire, a piece that astounds with its noble virtuosity.

Listen Again >

Janáček Suite, The Cunning Little Vixen
Dvořák Piano Concerto*
Suk Symphonic Poem, Ripening

Vladimir Jurowski conductor
Martin Helmchen piano
London Philharmonic Choir
London Philharmonic Orchestra

recorded 14 February 2012 at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall
*Supported by Dunard Fund

This stream of Dvorak’s Piano Concerto with Martin Helmchen is made courtesy of PentaTone. Helmchen’s CD recording of the Dvorak concerto is available on PentaTone 5186 366

www.lpo.org.uk


Reviews: 2 May 2012 – Vladimir Jurowski & Martin Helmchen

May 3, 2012

The London Philharmonic Orchestra’s 2011/12 season at Royal Festival Hall came to a close on Wednesday 2 May, when Principal Conductor Vladimir Jurowski conducted Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen Suite, Dvořák’s Piano Concerto with soloist Martin Helmchen; and Suk’s Ripening.

Reviewed by Alexandra Coghlan, The Arts Desk:
‘Cheeky and subversive as the Vixen herself, the LPO danced their way fluidly from episode to episode. Jurowski’s flexible tempos accommodated every glancing shift of mood, and while later in the Suk the LPO occasionally struggled to keep up, here all was organic and unanimous.’

Reviewed by Gavin Dixon, Orpheus Complex blog:
‘Like the pieces in the first half, [Suk’s Ripening] is not the sort of score that allows an orchestra to show off without having to work, but the preparation and the musical sensitivity here from everybody helped to bring this music to life. Do they deserve their obscurity? Perhaps, but they’re worth hearing every once in a while, especially when performed to this standard.’

The 2012/13 season opens on Wednesday 26 September, when Vladimir Jurowski conducts a programme of music by Richard Strauss and Zemlinsky. The concert opens with excerpts from Strauss’s thrilling opera Die Frau ohne Schatten (‘The Woman Without a Shadow’), considered by many to be his finest work in the genre, and also includes Zemlinsky’s dramatic and sinister one-act opera A Florentine Tragedy, based on Oscar Wilde’s dark and death-ridden play.

Full listings and booking details for the 2012/13 season

lpo.org.uk

Let us know what you thought of the concert!
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Reviews: 22 February 2012 – Vladimir Jurowski, Joshua Bell and the LPC

February 23, 2012

On Wednesday 22 February, the London Philharmonic Orchestra under Vladimir Jurowski performed Mozart’s Symphony No. 32; Zemlinsky’s Psalm 23 and Szymanowski’s Symphony No. 3 (The Song of the Night) with the London Philharmonic Choir; and Brahms’s Violin Concerto with soloist Joshua Bell.

The concert was broadcast live on BBC Radio 3, and is available to listen again here free of charge until 28 February.

Reviewed by Alexandra Coghlan, The Arts Desk:
The London Philharmonic Choir (particularly the upper voices) made a persuasive case for the more bucolic episodes [of the Zemlinsky], sitting smoothly on the rather self-consciously verdant pastures summoned by Jurowski’s woodwind and harps.

Reviewed by Mark Berry, Boulezian blog:
The organ-founded climaxes [of the Szymanowski] packed quite a punch, but it was the Debussyan and Tristan-esque magic that truly ravished, for which conductor, orchestra, and choir were equally responsible.

lpo.org.uk
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Reviews: 10 February 2012 – Marin Alsop & Lukáš Vondráček

February 13, 2012

On Friday 10 February, the London Philharmonic Orchestra under conductor Marin Alsop performed Kodály’s Concerto for Orchestra,  Dvořák’s Symphony No. 7, and Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with soloist Lukáš Vondráček.

Reviewed by Nick Breckenfield, Classicalsource.com:
Alsop whipped the LPO players into a frenzy, alert to every turn of tempo and Dvořák’s melodic profligacy. The horn solo in the second movement typified the quality of the whole (and mention must be made of top-notch contributions of the third and fourth horns too) … As all good concerts should, this one sent me out into the night with a much-changed mood. And an impatience for Alsop’s programmes next year with the LPO – American-themed as part of ‘The Rest is Noise’.

lpo.org.uk
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More reviews (2): 8 February 2012 – Marin Alsop & Stephen Hough

February 13, 2012

On Wednesday 8 February, the London Philharmonic Orchestra performed Martinů’s Symphony No. 6, Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8, and Liszt’s Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2, under conductor Marin Alsop with pianist Stephen Hough at Royal Festival Hall.

The concert was broadcast live on BBC Radio 3, and is available to listen again here free of charge until 15 February.

Reviewed by Stephen Pritchard, The Observer:
Whether crashing down the keyboard in the thunderous octaves of the opening movement of the first, or scampering about in the delicate filigree of the single-movement second, Hough displays an awesome technique. The gradual acceleration of the final movement of the first was breathtaking to behold, and the closing presto positively explosive. Listen again on the BBC iPlayer. You won’t be disappointed.

Reviewed by Richard Fairman, Financial Times:
Hough was assured of sterling support from the LPO and the evening’s conductor, Marin Alsop. Teamed with a soloist who is so light-fingered and agile, they were careful not be too loud or too heavy … Martinu’s Symphony No 6, not often heard, made a welcome start, clothed in more subtle colours than usual, and, to end, Alsop drew very decent playing from the LPO in a performance of Dvorák’s Symphony No 8, which, like her Brahms symphonies, came with good sense and enough vitality.

Previous reviews here and here.

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More reviews: 8 February 2012 – Marin Alsop & Stephen Hough

February 10, 2012

On Wednesday 8 February, the London Philharmonic Orchestra performed Martinů’s Symphony No. 6, Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8, and Liszt’s Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2, under conductor Marin Alsop with pianist Stephen Hough at Royal Festival Hall.

The concert was broadcast live on BBC Radio 3, and is available to listen again here free of charge until 15 February.

Reviewed by Andrew Clements, The Guardian:
Hough managed to combine … excitement and drama with a keyboard finesse and precision that were sometimes breathtakingly vivid.

Previous reviews here.

lpo.org.uk
Follow us on Twitter: @LPOrchestra


Podcast: Marin Alsop in conversation

February 9, 2012

February’s podcast contains part of a pre-concert talk given by Marin Alsop on 8 February before the first of three concerts with the London Philharmonic Orchestra in London and Nottingham.

 

American conductor Marin Alsop is a frequent guest with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Before one of her recent concerts in London which programmed music of central Europe, she gave a pre-concert talk in conversation with James Jolly. The topics explored include the soundworld of Martinů’s Sixth Symphony, Dvořák’s struggle to be accepted as a composer, and the orchestral writing in Liszt’s Piano Concertos.

The programme included Liszt’s Piano Concertos Nos. 1 and 2, performed by Stephen Hough, and Alsop shared the ways in which conducting concertos is a different kind of music-making to the symphonic repertoire.

The March release on the LPO Label is of Ravel’s Daphnis and Chloe ballet, recorded in 1979 with Bernard Haitink and taken from the BBC archive. The podcast ends with a preview of the new CD.

More information and listen >

www.lpo.org.uk


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